The Hidden Gifts of the Introverted Child: Helping Your Child Thrive in an Extroverted World

April 27, 2018 - Comment

Introverted children are often misunderstood, even by their parents, who worry about them. Engaged by their interior world, they’re often regarded as aloof. Easily overwhelmed by too much stimulation, they can be seen as unmotivated. Content with just one or two close friends, they may be perceived as unpopular. Parents fret that they are unhappy

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(as of November 13, 2019 6:57 pm GMT+0000 - Details)

Introverted children are often misunderstood, even by their parents, who worry about them. Engaged by their interior world, they’re often regarded as aloof. Easily overwhelmed by too much stimulation, they can be seen as unmotivated. Content with just one or two close friends, they may be perceived as unpopular. Parents fret that they are unhappy and maladjusted. But the truth is quite different: Introverted children are creative problem solvers. Introverted children love to learn. Introverted children have a high EQ (emotional IQ) and are in touch with their feelings. They take time to stop and smell the roses, and they enjoy their own company. They are dependable, persistent, flexible, and lack vanity.

How can parents help their introverted children discover and cultivate these wonderful gifts? Help is here. Written by Dr. Marti Olsen Laney, author of The Introvert Advantage with 74,000 copies in print, The Hidden Gifts of the Introverted Child fully explains introversion as a hardwired temperament, not a disability, and tells just what parents need to do to help their child become the person he or she is meant to be—and succeed in an extroverted world. Beginning with a 30-question quiz that places a child on the introvert/extrovert continuum, The Hidden Gifts shows parents how to foster a climate that allows introverted kids to discover their inner strengths; schedule ways for a very young innie to recharge those batteries and teach an older child to do it for him- or herself; create a harmonious household with siblings, and parents, of different temperaments; help innies find success at school, sports, parties, and other group activities.

Comments

M. Heiss says:

Describes half the so-called “difficult” kids I know My first reaction was, I’m _not_ going to like this book. The title seems too pop-psychology and the whole “hidden gifts” thing… anyway, my snap judgment was that this would be a cheesy book.Boy, am I glad I was wrong.America is an extroverted country. Nearly 75% of the people you have met are extraverts – they get energized by getting it done, getting going, getting together. Zoom zoom zoom. Certainly our media is set up that way, and our success stories are full…

BlakeL says:

Great Condition I bought this book in paperback form from a different seller being fulfilled by Amazon. The book was listed “Like-New”. However, there doesn’t seem to be anything used about it. The pages were clean and the spine unbent. I’m happy about that since I only paid less than $6 for it!The book contents are great! I checked this book out from my local library and after reading a few sections I knew I needed my own copy. I have learned tons about my daughter’s (2.5 year old toddler)…

Dr. Greg Grove says:

A great resource for teacher or parent As an introvert (INFJ) I was fascinated to find “me” on nearly every page! A great resource for teacher or parent. Gives you an appreciation for the psychologically neglected introvert personality type. May present “abuse” tactics nearly everyone makes when dealing with the introvert. Whether you are extrovert or introvert, a “must read” text, now and in the future.

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